Proud Supporter

GEWEHR 41 WW II German Semi Automatic Rifle
Licensed FLL Dealer and Gunsmith
We are restoring history one weapon at a time


 
"Every attempt to make war easy and safe will result in humiliation and disaster."
William Tecumseh Sherman






Yes we do quality work!     Click this image to enlarge.   

This site has morphed over the years. It started out as a place to document and store  information regarding the G41 rifle.
Over time we have branched out into the G43 rifles as well.  There are many sites out there with much of the same information, however many are no longer active.  That being said I am not finding many people that will work on these rifles.    We can do that for you.
 

It is my intent to document and list where I found the information and to give credit where credit is due. 
It has been interesting to say the least thus far. Sifting through the misinformation to get to the good information is proving to be a challenge.  There is a book out there as you may have seen "Hitler's Garands" by Darrin Weaver, this book has a couple of chapters on the G41s.  In fact about 35 pages deal with it G41's in one way or another. It does not get into taking apart this rifle. I found it more about the history of the weapon, productions numbers, production factories etc.
There is a wealth of information within its pages.  I have also been documenting my G43 travels.


Let me say right up front, I am not a Nazi lover, and or a want to be!    I am just a regular guy from the states that has found an interest in collecting WW II stuff. I can do that now that my kids have grown up and moved out.  As a kid my brother and I always thought that the Germans had the cool uniforms, helmets weapons etc.  Later I learned that was not by accident.  However growing up in the sixties there would be no German stuff allowed in our house.  God love her, I guess you could say my mom was the Nazi back then.  :) 

There were two distinct types of G41 rifles produced.  G41 M (Mauser) G41 W (Wathers) Two of Germanys top gun makers in competition to build the Army's first semi automatic rifle. 

Why the G41?    Well as I began collecting a few things here and there I had a chance to purchase a G41 DUV.

Having limited resources I did not envision purchasing one of these.   As it turned out it was missing a few parts and had some rust here and there.  Thus I was able to get it for what you would pay for a nice Russian capture K98 Mauser.
My rifle is a G41 DUV 1943 serial number 9764  g. A Walther's designed rifle that was produced by Berlin-Lübecker Maschinenfabrik .    Checking on Claus's  code page it appears to be one of the last rifles made before the G43's replaced them

  See it fire live on youtube.
 
I find the G41 very interesting with its limited production numbers of 117,400 rifles produced and short history. 
Owning the gun and having to put it back together as well as hunting for the few missing parts has taught me a lot about this weapon.  Compared to a Enfield 303 this rifle is very complicated.   The trigger assembly and receiver have a lot more moving parts than the 303.  After watching hours of interviews, and reading the forums these rifles had mixed reviews.  Some soldiers carried them until the end.  Others soldiers opted for the Russian SVT 40.  By all accounts the G41 replacement rifle,  G43 was a welcomed upgrade for sure. 


As the story goes this rifle was found under a house on a foundation ledge.  The house apparently developed some plumbing issues.  The repair team came in and found the rifle once they were under the house.   Upon presenting it to the home owner (who didn't know it was there). The two agreed to a purchase price. Apparently the original owner had moved some 8 or so years before.   I don't know the exact amount but it was $200.00 or less as the owner didn't know what it was, and clearly it was in rough shape.

To make a long story short the new owner took the gun to a gun smith / friend who deemed the gun unworthy of restoring without spending lots of money.
The rifle missing the trigger guard, and mag was wrapped up with what appears to be an original sling.  The owner couldn't get the sling undone so he cut it in half. It was at that time the rifle supposedly fell apart.  How the trigger assembly was taken completely apart I do not know.  I do know once together they will not fall apart.    In any event photos of the rifle partly in a zip lock bag and partly together were sent to me.  
I met with the owner and the two of us came to a agreeable price.  His gunsmith wanted to part the rifle out and this guy didn't.  Nor did I.     Thus my journey for parts, and knowledge began.  


Not everybody has a Tiger Tank hatch in the their office.  :)

Abandoned in rural France, Germany?  Perhaps an eastern front little by gone town. 

Click to enlarge this image.

So when you look at this lonely abandoned G43 you have to wonder what the story is.  I can tell you that this rifle has been sitting for many years leaned up against this wall. 

Click here to read more.


Whats in your barrel!
G43 Good Barrel
G43 unfired in years
G43 what the ...











    
  During my journey I contacted just about everybody and anybody on the web. In doing so I have found it difficult to get folks to reply to emails.
In some cases even phone calls go unreturned.   I do not understand it.  You have a business and you still wont return the call or email.  Not once but on multiple occasions.   In fact I would say only about half of those contacted replied within 24 hours.  To me that's fine, especially given some folks are half way around the world. If you received an email and don't respond, it is no different than if you asked me a question in person and I don't answer you.
I feel the same way regarding text messages.  

   
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